Home > Uncategorized > TortoiseGit – round 2, fight!

TortoiseGit – round 2, fight!


For some odd reason, I’ve gotten my head wrapped around TortoiseGit and hence this follow-up post.

Cloning a public repository successfully is neat… but not exactly useful.

So, for this post I’m going to try a couple of tricky things in rapid succession:

  1. creating conflicting changes in a clone that I have to resolve when I push
  2. create two radically different changesets consistent with two sparring developers

And if I get really creative, maybe I’ll try to clone an SVN repository just for the heck of it.

First things first.

Cloning my local repo was trivial, and not worth detailing. I created two conflicting changes, one in the master and one in the cloned repo. Committed in the clone with no issues, then hit the “push” dialog.

I was expecting some kind of error, or perhaps a merge dialog to pop up – but instead I got the following very confusing error message.

git.exe push “origin” master:master

To prevent you from losing history, non-fast-forward updates were rejected
Merge the remote changes before pushing again. See the ‘Note about
fast-forwards’ section of ‘git push –help’ for details.
To C:\Users\foo\Downloads\hg-git
! [rejected] master -> master (non-fast-forward)
error: failed to push some refs to ‘C:\Users\foo\Downloads\hg-git’

As a complete and total git newbie, I found this error message very confusing. What is a fast-forward update? I actually missed the “merge the remote changes” message the first time through. This dialog is not very useful – why not list the log message of the remote changes that need to be pulled? This would be much more user friendly. At the very least, it should pop up with a button to pull & merge.

Hmmm… what to do next.

The dialog says I need to merge, but I seem to remember reading something about pulling before a merge.

How about TortoiseGit->Pull?

The result is shown below in the following image.

Wow, that is not only confusing, but downright useless.

Unless I completely missed something, there’s no easy “edit conflicts” button that pops up the 3-way merge tool. I actually had to search around for a bit to figure it out. You can either right click on a file and then select TortoiseGit->Edit conflicts, or you can use the “Check for modifications” link to show a list of all changed (and conflicting) files.

OK, so I edited the conflicts, then committed them to my local clone. Now what happens if I push?

git.exe push “origin” master:master

remote: error: refusing to update checked out branch: refs/heads/master
remote: error: By default, updating the current branch in a non-bare repository
remote: error: is denied, because it will make the index and work tree inconsistent
remote: error: with what you pushed, and will require ‘git reset –hard’ to match
remote: error: the work tree to HEAD.
remote: error:
remote: error: You can set ‘receive.denyCurrentBranch’ configuration variable to
remote: error: ‘ignore’ or ‘warn’ in the remote repository to allow pushing into
remote: error: its current branch; however, this is not recommended unless you
remote: error: arranged to update its work tree to match what you pushed in some
remote: error: other way.
remote: error:
remote: error: To squelch this message and still keep the default behaviour, set
remote: error: ‘receive.denyCurrentBranch’ configuration variable to ‘refuse’.
To C:\Users\foo\Downloads\hg-git
! [remote rejected] master -> master (branch is currently checked out)
error: failed to push some refs to ‘C:\Users\foo\Downloads\hg-git’

Wow, this is so lame I’m almost ready to give up on git.

At this point, git is zero for two on the user friendliness scale. So far my googling for the many error messages in this git-barf just turn up more of the same – I can’t push from master -> master on a local repository. Which is completely and totally not helpful, and doesn’t make any logical sense.

It’s getting late, so I’ll post back when I git this figured out (ha ha very punny).

Atto

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Categories: Uncategorized Tags: , , ,
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  1. May 12, 2010 at 11:00 pm
  2. January 2, 2011 at 8:13 pm

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